Category Archives for "End of Day Analysis"

Apr 12

These are the discounts we were asking for

By Jani Ziedins | End of Day Analysis

Free After-Hours Analysis:

On Thursday the S&P500 bounced back from Wednesday’s modest weakness and continues hovering near 2,650 resistance. Headlines remain overwhelmingly negative. Wednesday added a potential military response in Syria and confirmation from the Fed to expect three more rate-hikes this year. That is on top of Trump’s trade war and Muller’s growing investigation.

But rather than fear these waves of bad news, the market is holding up remarkably well. Owners have been given more than enough excuses to drop everything and run for the exits. Yet most of them seem content holding for higher prices. Strong price-action in the face of bad news is typically very bullish. If this market was going to crash, it would have happened by now. That tells us the path of least resistance is higher, not lower.

While it is tempting to argue with the market and insist it must go down because of all of these bearish headlines, the thing to remember is we trade the market, not the news. If the market doesn’t care about these headlines, then neither should we. The trade war and Muller’s investigation has been with us for weeks, even months. Everyone who fears these headlines has been given plenty of time to get out. Every one of these nervous sellers has been replaced by confident dip buyers who demonstrated a willingness to hold these risks. Once all the people who are afraid of a headline are out of the market, then the headline stops mattering because it is priced in.

Technically we are at the upper end of the latest trading range and that leaves us vulnerable to a dip back to the lower end of the range and even a test of support. But that won’t change anything. This weakness would be a buying opportunity, not an excuse to sell stocks. This is a resilient market and these discounts are attractive. A couple of months ago people were begging for a dip so they could get in at cheaper prices. The market answered our prayers. Don’t lose your nerve now.

The thing to remember is we cannot pick a bottom and it isn’t even worth trying. Once we come to terms with that idea, then we are left choosing between buying too early, or buying too late. If prices slip a little further over the next few days and weeks, all that means is we bought a little too early. No big deal. As I said earlier, if this market was fragile and vulnerable to a crash, it would have happened by now. Instead we should be impressed by how well it is holding up despite these waves of negative news. That tells us this market is strong, not weak. These are attractive discounts attractive even if prices slip a little further, which they might not. Wait too long and you will miss this opportunity.


Bitcoin surged today on news that some high-profile money managers are buying. While on the surface that sounds like good news, it probably isn’t as bullish as it seems. First, these guys are really good at keeping secrets when they are buying. They only let it out after they finished accumulating their positions because obviously they don’t want the price to surge while they are buying. Second, if these whales have been buying over the last few weeks and months, shouldn’t prices have bounced more meaningfully? If this is the best BTC could do while these big money managers were accumulating positions, what happens when they finish buying? The knee-jerk reaction was to send prices higher on the news, but unless other people follow these big names into Bitcoin, prices will resume their down-trend. I don’t expect prices to bounce until we get in the $4k range and all today’s headlines do is delay the inevitable.

Much like the broad market, the FAANG stocks are basing and are on solid ground. These are the discounts we’ve been waiting for and months from now people will be kicking themselves for not buying more at these levels. Have we put in the bottom yet? Maybe. Maybe not. But either way this will be a profitable position months from now. Our P&L doesn’t care if we buy early or we buy late, as long as we buy.

Jani

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Apr 10

What to make of these whipsaws

By Jani Ziedins | End of Day Analysis

Free After-Hours Analysis:

The S&P500’s whipsaw continues as Monday’s fizzle turned into Tuesday’s surge. On Monday the market opened strong following a weekend where tariff headlines cooled. Unfortunately the relief was short-lived because a FBI raid on Trump’s personal lawyer sent the market tumbling from its early highs. But Monday night the president of China took a conciliatory tone in a speech about trade and that was enough to kick off Tuesday’s buying frenzy. What does Wednesday have in store? If overnight futures falling 0.5% are any indication, it looks like another whipsaw is headed our way.

Lets discuss the big headlines one at a time. Stocks popped Tuesday when China’s president said he wanted to open the country up to more free trade. While that was a good start, it is a long way from a done deal. As they say, talk is cheap. What these promises of freer trade don’t include is a timeframe and Trump has often accused China of appeasing previous administrations with phony promises it never delivered on. Chances are good Trump will brush off these Chinese overtures and keep applying pressure. And more than that, let’s remember this is the “Art of the Deal” president. If the Chinese really are willing to give an inch, expect Trump to demand a mile. Without a doubt the trade headlines are anything but over and we should expect a bumpy road as we approach next month’s tariff deadlines.

The second story dominating headlines is Muller’s investigation into the Trump administration. The knee-jerk reaction was for owners to sell the news of the FBI raid. But reality is most of that reactionary fear is misplaced. Trump already delivered on tax and regulatory reforms, so most of the good stuff from the market’s perspective is already behind us. If Trump gets bogged down by a scandal, it won’t really affect the things the market cares about. In fact, given Trump’s strong nationalist bent lately, it could actually be a good thing for stocks. If a scandal consumes Trump’s time, energy, and political capital, that means there is less he can do to screw thing sup. As strange as it sounds, a paralyzed Congress and White House is actually bullish. Two decades ago when the Clinton White House was embroiled in a scandal that eventually lead to Clinton’s impeachment, the stock market actually went up. That’s because our government was too busy discussing a blue dress to mess up the economy. Most likely the same thing will happen here. The less our politicians do, the better off we are.

Technically speaking, the market continues hovering near the lows and is falling into a 2,600ish-2,650ish trading range. The problem with sticking near the lows is it makes it more likely that we will stumble under them. Violating widely followed technical levels near 2,600 and 2,550 will trigger swift waves of stop-loss selling and send us tumbling. On the other side, breaking 2,650 overhead resistance is unlikely to trigger waves of breakout buying. Instead demand will most likely dry up as those with cash adopt a wait-and-see approach given all the volatility and uncertainty that surrounds the market. Remember, stocks fall a lot faster than they go up. whi


While the near-term prognosis for stocks is cautious, the economic outlook is actually quite positive. That means any near-term weakness is simply another dip buying opportunity. This is especially true of the vaunted FAANG stocks. These tech highfliers are carving out a base and a few months from now people will be kicking themselves for not buying these discounts. These are attractive levels for anyone with a longer time horizon even if we fall a little lower over the near-term. Remember, no one can consistently pick a bottom. That means either we buy too-early, or we buy too-late. What a trader chooses to do largely depends on their personality and risk tolerance.

It seems like everyone has forgotten about bitcoin and it hardly gets mentioned in the mainstream financial press anymore. That’s a problem for bitcoin bulls because they need the exposure to encourage new buyers to come into the market. As I’ve been writing about for a while, bursting bubbles take six months or more to play out. That happened during the first three major corrections in bitcoin and there is every indication that is what is happening here. At best we are in the middle innings and we should expect further weakness to come. While $6k seems to be providing support, let’s not forget we said the same thing about $14k, $12k, $10k, $9k, $8k, and $7k. I hope everyone sees the pattern here. Expect bitcoin to undercut February’s lows over the next few weeks and for that to trigger a wave of defensive selling that doesn’t stop until we slip into the $4k range. Then and only then can we buy the dip for a quick bounce.

Jani

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Apr 05

Trump did it again.

By Jani Ziedins | End of Day Analysis

Free After-Hours Update:

Thursday was another strong day for the S&P500. Unfortunately that doesn’t matter anymore because after the close Trump announced he wants to triple the Chinese tariffs. It seems China hurt his feelings when they “unfairly retaliated” against his first and second rounds of tariffs.

Clearly someone doesn’t understand how trade wars work. Unfortunately that person is the president of the United States. To save one-thousand jobs in the steel and aluminum industry, Trump is now threatening hundreds of thousand, if not millions of Americans jobs in other industries. Even the steel and aluminum industries are opposed to his trade war because it doesn’t matter what aluminum and steel prices are if their manufacturing customers’ businesses are crumbling.

The overnight futures plunged 1.5% on the news. If that’s all that happens, then we should count ourselves lucky. The market’s latest rebound was based on the idea that the worst of the trade war is behind us. That the last couple of weeks of threats were nothing more than posturing ahead of far more reasonable negations and thoughtful compromises. Unfortunately Trump threw cold water on that idea and now the market has been thrown back into turmoil.

I wish I could say this will turn out fine and this is nothing more than the start of another buyable dip. An opportunity for those that missed Tuesday’s rebound to jump aboard the rally. Unfortunately no I longer have those convictions. Things would be different if I knew we were dealing with a “rational actor”. Someone who made sensible decisions based on the facts and chose what was in his own best interests. But clearly Trump is not acting this way. Nearly every member of Congress, both Democrats and Republicans alike are unified against this trade war. Very rarely do both sides of the aisle agree on anything, but they are quickly coming together over this. The business community is equally unified in their opposition to Trump’s trade war. And 100 years of economic experience learned the hard way taught us it is impossible to win trade wars. Too bad Trump isn’t listening.

Are today’s threats simply more political posturing ahead of negotiations? I wish I knew. But the one thing I do know is the market hates uncertainty and I don’t think the stock market is going to forgive Trump as easily this time. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. It will be interesting to see how this turns out, but this is one of those things that is better watched from the safety of the sidelines.

There is a chance Trump could quickly backtrack on his threats. And maybe China’s leadership will be the bigger man and won’t respond to Trump’s threats. But no matter what, traders are quickly learning to distrust Trump. The market hates uncertainty and the way Trump handles himself does nothing but stir up controversy and uncertainty. Mr. Trump, thank you for the tax cuts, but the rest of us would appreciate it if you didn’t touch anything else.

It’s really hard to say how the market will respond to these headlines. A lot of nervous owners have been selling the tariff headlines over the last few weeks. They have been replaced by confident dip-buyers who were unafraid of these headlines because they assumed everything would work out. Which until this evening looked like it was happening. Will these confident dip buyers remain as confident when Trump is threatening to escalate the trade war for a third time? Will they confidently sit through China’s inevitable retaliation? Maybe. Or maybe they will lose their nerve and “get out before things get worse”.

I was one of those confident dip buyers and everything looked awesome this afternoon as my profits were piling up. But all of a sudden I’m not as confident anymore. I have a reasonable profit cushion, but I’m definitely less confident than I was this afternoon and I will seriously think about locking in profits tomorrow. If too many people feel the same way, Friday could be an ugly day. The only thing we can do is wait for China’s response and hope that confident owners stay that way.

Jani

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Apr 03

It it time to buy?

By Jani Ziedins | End of Day Analysis

Free After-Hours Update:

The S&P500 bounced back Tuesday, recovering a big chunk of Monday’s selloff. Things got ugly Monday after China announced 30 billion of retaliatory tariffs in response Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs. Fortunately the worst fears dissipated by Tuesday and the S&P500 reclaimed the 200dma and 2,600 support. While we are still on thin-ice, it was encouraging to see traders more inclined to buy the dip instead of turning Tuesday into another bloodbath.

The stock market fell in love with Trump and his tax cuts in 2017. Unfortunately the relationship has been far less blissful in 2018. Trump’s protectionist stances are contrary to the market’s preference for free and open trade. To this point the announced tariffs and retaliations have been modest and manageable. But the fear is round one could lead to rounds two, three, four, and five. The problem with trade wars is once they get started, retaliations and counter-retaliations get out of hand quickly. And so far China claims they are willing to go tit-for-tat with Trump. The biggest question is how far Trump is willing to take this.

The situation got even more complicated Tuesday afternoon when Trump announced a second round of tariffs specifically aimed at China’s anti-competitive practices. While overnight futures are down some, they are actually holding up relatively well for what looks like the start of round two of these trade wars.

It is encouraging to see the futures market only give up a small portion of Tuesdays gains. While things could change during Wednesday’s regular session, the longer these tariff headlines play out, the more they get priced in. That’s because owners who fear a trade war with China have been bailing out of the market for several weeks already. Once a pessimist leaves the market, he is replaced by a confident dip buyer who is willing to hold these headline risks. This turnover in ownership, replacing fearful owners with confident dip buyers, is what helps the market find a floor. While it is too early to say the worst is behind us, the potential for a larger selloff diminishes with each successive round of fearful headlines. Nervous sellers can only sell once. After they leave the market, their opinion no longer matters. And maybe, just maybe this is what is propping up the market here. If it doesn’t react strongly to Trump’s second wave of Tariffs on Wednesday, then the market has already largely priced them in.

And none of this surprised those of us that were paying attention. As I warned subscribers last week, holding near 2,600 for several days was an ominous sign. The inability to rebound decisively left us vulnerable. The longer we hold near support, the more likely it is we will violate it. And that is exactly what happened Monday. While I had no idea what the headline would be, I knew we were vulnerable to a reactionary selloff and the risks were elevated. But I also told subscribers that a dip under support was to be bought, not sold. As I wrote earlier, the longer a story plays out in the news, the more it gets priced in. The first dip is always the most shocking. But each successive dip gets smaller and smaller. While Monday’s headline losses were shocking, most of what we gave up were last week’s rebound. The actual dip under support was far less significant and bouncing so quickly after crashing through support was an encouraging buy signal.

A couple of months ago people were begging for a dip so they could get in at cheaper prices. But now that the dip is here, those same people are too afraid to buy. The thing to remember about risk is it is a function of height. Despite how it feels, the lower we go, the less risky owning stocks is. That’s because a lot of the downside has already been realized. While we could slip even further over the next few days and weeks, without a doubt it is better to have bought at these levels than at much higher prices when it felt safe. The most successful traders are the ones who buy when other people are fearful and sell when everyone else feels safe. Even though prices could slip a little further, this is still a very attractive place to be buying. We were asking for a dip and the market gave it to us. Don’t lose your nerve now just because everyone else is freaked out.


Bitcoin continues to struggle. Even though prices bounced on Tuesday, a few hundred dollar rebound from recent lows is a pathetic bounce for BTC. We are still most definitely in a strong down trend and there is no reason to think the worst is behind us. The thing to keep in mind is prices bounce decisively from grossly oversold levels. It is hard to claim last week’s dip to $6,500 was anything like the shocking free falls over the last few months. And the same can be said of today’s few hundred dollar rebound. If we haven’t reached shockingly oversold levels yet, then we are not done falling yet. Expect prices to undercut Feburary’s lows over the next few weeks and that violation to trigger a large wave of defensive selling. Don’t expect prices to bounce until we fall into the $4k range. Then and only then will it be safe to buy the bounce.

The tech trade has also been weighing on the stock market lately. But the fever broke Monday when FAANG stocks failed to undercut their recent lows (unlike the broad market). That relative strength told us prices were actually firming up because owners were less inclined to sell them. As the saying goes, the stock market predicted nine of the last five recessions. The same can be said for the market predicting the demise of the tech trade. In a few weeks time most people will be kicking themselves for not buying this dip.

Jani

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Mar 08

Why bad news doesn’t matter

By Jani Ziedins | End of Day Analysis

End of Day Update:

On Thursday the S&P 500 rallied after Trump unveiled his less-bad-than-feared tariff plans. He included exemptions for Mexico and Canada and left the door open for further flexibility with other allies. The market’s strength puts us just below the 50dma, a level that has acted as resistance the last few weeks.

I’m impressed with the market’s resilience in the face of what could have been interpreted as bad news. Most Republicans and members of the business community opposed Trump’s tariff plans because they believe it will cost more jobs than it creates. But either the market doesn’t care, or it doesn’t think it will be a big deal because we already erased the losses following Trump’s surprise announcement.

A market that rallies on bad news is a strong market. It doesn’t matter which side of the tariff debate we fall on, we are traders and the only thing that matters is what the market thinks. When confident owners refuse to sell, it doesn’t matter what the headlines are. I’m impressed with the market’s strength and the path of least resistance is still higher. If we were going to crumble on these headlines, it would have happened already. That means there is not much downside risk over the near-term.


Bitcoin finds itself in a bit of a rut as it stumbled under $9k for the first time in several weeks. What started as a routine dip a few days ago built downside momentum and we already exceeded the lows of a couple of weeks ago. Either we are carving out a near-term double bottom and will resume the rebound over $12k. Or owners will panic and bailout before “things get worse”.

While I still think there is more downside for BTC over the medium and long-term, it takes six months or more for a bursting bubble to find a bottom. That means there are still many months of bounces along the way. Now that we undercut the late February lows and triggered all that reactive and defensive selling, we should be in better shape. I wouldn’t rush in at these levels, but if we bounce above $10k, we should be on our way past $12k.

Mar 06

Is a trade war coming?

By Jani Ziedins | End of Day Analysis

End of Day Update:

Tuesday was a relatively benign session for the S&P500 with prices bouncing between modest losses and gains. But that no longer matters because shortly after the close, Trump’s top economic advisor dropped a bombshell by resigning in protest over the proposed tariffs.

This is a major blow to business groups because Gary Cohn was the leading proponent for business interests inside the Trump administration. Unfortunately he lost the tug-of-war with the pro-nationalist advisors. Potentially this marks a big shift in Trump’s policy priorities going forward.

The market is most definitely concerned about this development and futures are down more than 1%. Previously prices had been recovering from last week’s selloff on hope Trump would moderate his stance on universally applied tariffs. But now it looks increasingly likely we are headed for a trade war with our North American and European allies. I warned readers last week this could get ugly and unfortunately it looks like that is the way this is headed.

I most definitely disagree with Trump, there are no winners in a trade war. The proposed steel and aluminum tariffs will raise prices on goods Americans buy. Higher prices means less money left over for other things. And that is just the start. Europe already outlined retaliatory tariffs they will apply to American made products. As a whole, the EU’s economy and population is larger than the United States, so that will definitely have an impact on domestic exporters. Even the Aluminum Association that represents 144 producers wrote a letter to Trump saying they don’t support these tariffs because they think it will harm their customers.

Different reports I’ve seen said these tariffs will add about 1,000 jobs in the steel and aluminum industry, but costs us tens of thousands of jobs in other industries because of the higher steel and aluminum costs as well as the consequences of foreign retaliatory tariffs. The math just doesn’t add up and is why almost all business leaders and most Republicans in Congress are strongly opposed to Trump’s plan. The only logical conclusion is Cohn resigned because he felt like his views were not being listened to and that most likely means Trump is siding with the pro-nationalists on this issue, not the business community and fellow Republicans.

Inevitably this won’t be as bad as people fear because lobbyists will put loopholes large enough to drive a truck through, but we should expect a lot more volatility over the near-term as the trade war rhetoric ramps up. We will likely see further weakness over the next week. I don’t think this is a reason to dump long-term positions unless the retaliations get ridiculous, but swing-traders should wait for better prices before buying the dip.


Bitcoin prices continue to hover above $10k despite a wave of negative headlines over recent days. There was more talk of Korea and other countries banning Bitcoin. A month or two ago this would have sent prices tumbling. Instead we are only down $1k from recent highs. That tells us sentiment is improving as prices rebound from the $6k lows. The path of least resistance remains higher over the near-term, but it will take weeks for us to break $12k, $13k, and flirt with $14k. In the meantime, expect lots of back-and-forth.

Mar 01

Is it different this time?

By Jani Ziedins | End of Day Analysis

End of Day Update

It’s been a rough few days for the S&P500. First the new Fed chairman hinted at four rate-hikes this year versus the previously expected three. Then Trump blindsided the market Thursday by announcing 25% across the board steel tariffs and 10% on aluminum. Those headlines sent us crashing through 2,700 support on the highest volume since February’s big selloff.

Prior to Trump’s announcement, it looked like the market was coming to terms with a fourth rate-hike. This story is a close cousin of the inflation concerns that sparked February’s correction. Many of the owners that fear inflation and rate-hikes had already bailed out of the market, meaning there were fewer sellers this time. The lack of wider supply likely meant we would have bounce near 2,700 support.

But then Trump’s protectionist stance went far further than most were expecting, both in the size of the tariffs and the universally applied nature of them. While it is true that those mid-west, blue-collar voters are the ones that put him in the White House, this is definitely a case of hurting the many to help a few. The cost of these tariffs will be carried entirely by American consumers through higher prices. Higher prices means lower demand and less discretionary income. All to help the small segment of uncompetitive metal producers. And it doesn’t stop there, many countries will slap retaliatory tariffs on US made goods, decreasing demand for US products, directly affecting a wide swath of manufacturing jobs.

The sad thing is these tariffs won’t even bring steel and aluminum jobs back because anything that can be done with this president’s pen will likely be undone by the next president’s pen. Most steel and aluminum manufactures know this and is why they won’t do much except crank up their old, dirty, and inefficient plants. They’re not going to invest new money when they know this boon is only fleeting. But common sense has no place in politics and midterm elections are coming up.

Assuming Trump doesn’t back off due to the huge amount of criticism his proposal has gotten, starting trade wars will be bad for American consumers and businesses. That will directly impact earnings, growth, employment, and discretionary income. If Trump follows through and foreign nations retaliate, stock prices will suffer. These proposed tariffs are bigger and more severe than expected and most definitely not priced in. It will take a while for the market to come to terms with these headlines we could see prices slump further as investors weight the ramifications.

That said, I don’t think this will be enough to trigger a recession. If it is like any other bill, it will be crafted by special interest groups and have loop-holes large enough to drive a truck through. But it will be significant enough to undo a lot of the economic growth from the tax cuts. If Trump follows through, it could turn this year’s bull market into a sideways market.

At the moment there is no reason to sell long-term positions, but this weakness could persist and give dip-buyers a better entry point over the next few trading sessions. Or Trump could do what Trump does and change his mind. If he takes it all back, prices will surge higher in relief.


Bitcoin prices continue to do well. As I wrote last week, selling pressure over the near-term abated and the path of least resistance was higher. And so far that has been the case with prices now creeping above $11k. Breaking $12k is a no brainer and we will likely surpass $13k and even flirt with $14k over the next few weeks.

But this is a trade, not an investment. Major selloffs like we are in the middle of take 6, 12, even 24 months to bottom. We are still in the early innings of BTC’s correction. While there will be lots of profitable swing-trades along the way, lower-lows are still ahead of us. That means take profits when you have them and resist the temptation to hold too long.

Jani

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Feb 27

Are stocks on the verge of plunging?

By Jani Ziedins | End of Day Analysis

End of Day Update:

The S&P500 started Tuesday with modest gains, but the new Fed chief spooked the market when he hinted at four rate-hikes this year instead of the previously expected three. That was enough to send us into a tailspin that erased Monday’s breakout.

The Fed told us the economy is getting stronger and the market sells off. That’s like someone complaining about making $3 million because their taxes will go up. (If anyone feels that way, send the money my way and I will happily pay the taxes!)

Anyway, the market is fretting that things are too good. When is too good ever a problem? Well there is the inevitable excess that leads to the next economic contraction, aka a recession. But that is still a ways off because there are few claiming our economy is already overheated. In reality we are just starting to warm up following a prolonged period of lethargic growth. The Fed raising rates is simply us returning to historically normal levels and it is most definitely not yet approaching smothering levels.

Most market participants agree with the above assessment and is why we shouldn’t expect Tuesday’s dip to go very far, especially since it follows February’s selloff. That plunge under 2,600 scared off most of the weak holders and they were replaced by confident dip-buyers. Out with the weak and in with the strong means we are standing of fairly stable ground. Conceivably we could slip as far as 2,700, but that is unlikely and would represent a dip buying opportunity, not a justification to sell reactively.

It is not unusual to experience some downside volatility following the recent gains and lingering uncertainly. But market crashes are brutally quick and false bottoms last days, not weeks. The fact the market held up so well the last few weeks tells us most owners still believe in this market and Tuesday’s headlines didn’t change that. These owners will keep holding and their confidence is keeping supply tight. If we were going to plunge further, it would have happened by now. Tuesday’s dip was much-ado-about-nothing and any near-term weakness is a dip-buying opportunity.


As expected, Bitcoin slipped under $10k over the weekend, but the selloff failed to build momentum and we have since recovered above this psychologically significant support level. Runaway selling is taking a break because the weak hands have already been flushed out. Selloffs cannot get started when there is no one left to sell the dip. Things look good over the near-term the path of least resistance is higher. We will most likely break $13k and even push toward $14k over the next few weeks.

But the thing to remember is BTC is still very much in a downtrend. While we can buy this rebound for a quick trade, this is most definitely not a good place to invest in BTC for the long-term. These rallies are to be sold, not held or chased. Lower-lows are still ahead of us and we haven’t seen the worst of this selloff yet. Bitcoin prices peaked at the end of 2013 and it took nearly two-years before the selloff and consolidation ended. Most likely it will be another six-months before BTC finally reaches a bottom. Until then expect lower-highs and lower-lows.

Jani

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Feb 22

Are we on the verge of another leg lower?

By Jani Ziedins | End of Day Analysis

End of Day Update:

The S&P500 started Thursday with healthy gains, unwinding all of Wednesday’s losses and then some. Unfortunately the buying didn’t last and prices slipped back near breakeven by the close. This is the fifth day the 50dma has been a ceiling for stocks.

There were not any economic headlines to speak of and instead investors are still grappling with the ramifications of rising inflation and interest rates. Some people think these will smother a fragile economy. Other feel this is the economy finally returning to more normal levels following a prolonged stretch of lethargic growth.

Count me as a member of the latter group. Even though inflation and interest rates have jumped a substantial amount, we are only approaching what used to be considered low rates during more normal times. Traders fretting the worst are fearing something that hasn’t shown its face yet. So far the economic data does not show any hints the economy is slowing down. These skeptical traders fear what “could” happen, but so far the data doesn’t support their concerns.

Even though the fears that triggered February’s correction appear overblown, the large selloff brought the rally back to earth. A substantial amount of technical damage occurred and we shouldn’t expect prices to zoom back to the highs any time soon. As I was wrote last week, the rebound’s rate of gains was unsustainable and prices would likely stall at the 50dma. And so far that is exactly what happened.

But it is not all bad. Even though we are struggling with 50dma resistance, holding these levels for five days shows support for prices. Prices tumble from overbought and unsustainable levels quickly and so far that hasn’t happened. That tells us the worst of February’s selloff is already behind us and we don’t need to fear another big selloff. That said, the selloff damaged sentiment and technicals enough that it will take time for traders to trust this market again. That means we will trade sideways for a while and consolidate the previous rally’s gains. This is normal and healthy behavior and there is nothing to fear.

The thing to remember about sideways consolidations is they include moves in both directions. At times the market will look like it is breakout out. Other times is seems like it is breaking down. But these are just gyrations inside a trading range. Over the near-term, weakness should be bought and strength sold. Don’t be one of those people the market fools into buying high and selling low. Have the confidence and conviction to trade against these swings.


As expected, Bitcoin’s surge to $12k stalled and pulled back. As I’ve been writing, the time to buy the dip is when everyone is scared and fearing the worst. Not after a rebound spread a sigh of relief through the crowd. Even though prices slipped back under the psychologically significant $10k level, the selling largely stalled and prices are not entering free-fall. Even though I think BTC’s worst days are still ahead of us, we are in the eye of the storm and prices will stabilize over the near-term. If we can hold $10k for another week or two, a follow-on rally up to $14k is not unreasonable. But since lower-lows are still ahead of us, any rallies should be sold, not chased. Previous crashes in BTC resulted in price declines greater than 80% and it took half a year or longer to finally bottom. Since we are only two months into this and only down 50%, we still have a ways to go. In the meantime, enjoy this brief reprieve and for the bravest of the brave, there might be a chance to buy the dip in a week or two.

Jani

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Feb 20

What’s coming next, new highs or new lows?

By Jani Ziedins | End of Day Analysis

End of Day Update:

After six days of gains, the S&P500 finally slipped into the red Tuesday. The size of the loss was insignificant when compared to last week’s rebound, but seeing the market bump its head on the 50dma was insightful, even if the pause was expected.

Financial headlines continue to be benign and most traders are focused on the longer-term ramifications of rising interest rates and inflation. Fears over these items sparked February’s sharp selloff, but have since failed to extend the selloff. It seems most traders who fear higher interest rates and inflation already sold and were replaced by new owners willing to hold those risks. While the recent correction rattled investor nerves, it didn’t shatter confidence and most owners are confidently holding for higher prices.

That said, February’s selloff was large enough that we cannot bounce back like nothing happened. Deep and emotional selloffs leave their scars and it takes a while for prices to build back to their previous levels. We recovered a huge chunk last week, but the rate of that rise was unsustainable and pausing at the 50dma is a normal and healthy thing to do.

We put enough time and distance from the dip’s lows to say the early February selloff is over. Market crashes are breathtakingly quick and almost never include six consecutive up-days in the middle of the crash. Without a doubt we can undercut those lows, but it will take a new catalyst to kick off the another leg lower and it will be a new selloff, not an extension of February’s emotional selling.

But just because the selloff is over doesn’t mean we are back in rally mode. We often see volatile trade during consolidations and base building. That means sharp rebounds followed by another round of selling. It wouldn’t be unusual or unexpected to see last week’s rebound stall at the 50dma and retreat back toward 2,600 support. Emotions are elevated and that means traders oscillate between believing everything is great to fearing the end of the world. This wide range of emotions leads to the bounces and dips that form traditional bases and consolidations. In range bound markets, it is best to trade against the market by buying weakness and selling strength. Don’t let the crowd’s emotions trick you into giving away money by buying high and selling low.

This isn’t rocket science, we just need to be pay attention because the market keeps doing the same thing over and over. In January I warned readers the relentless rise in prices was unsustainable. After February’s 10% correction, I told readers the selling went too far and it was actually the safest time to buy in months. And after six consecutive up-days, I warned readers that we would stall at the 50dma. This isn’t hard if you know what to look for. And to answer the question in this post’s headline, neither. This is a range bound market we shouldn’t expect a strong directional move anytime soon.


Bitcoin’s rebound continued over the weekend and got near $12k. Everything looks a lot better after a 100% bounce off of the lows. But that is what makes me nervous. The time to buy is when everyone is predicting a collapse, not when everyone is feeling better.

This rebound took a lot of pressure off of BTC owners, but we will start running into overhead resistance. Many premature dip-buyers jumped in between $12k and $15k and we should expect many of those regretful owners to sell when they can get their money back. Their selling will slow the assent over the near-term.

Over the medium-term, I question where the next round of BTC buyers will come from. This latest selloff burned new investors and scared off prospective investors. On the other end of the spectrum, BTC bulls bought everything they could during this dip and are now fully invested. Where does the new money come from? I cannot answer that question and is why I don’t believe the bottom has been put in yet. Previous BTC selloffs erased more than 80% of the value and took more than six months to complete. If we do the same this time, we won’t bottom until we fall under $4k and it won’t happen until sometime this summer or fall.

Until further notice, BTC is still in a downtrend and that means bounces should be sold.

Jani

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